Linux Commands

Linux uname Command tutorial

Uname is a short form of Unix name. This is a very useful command in Linux, which provides hardware and software information in the current running system.

This short manual will show you how to get all system information through the Uname command.

Syntax:

$ uname [option]

Options:

There are several ways to filter out the details you want.

1. -a option:

Use -a option with uname command to display all possible information about your current running system.

$ uname –a

D:\Aqsa\12 march\Linux uname Command tutorial\Linux uname Command tutorial\images\image7 final.png

2. -s option:

We can use the –s option to display currently using kernel name and information.

$ uname –s

D:\Aqsa\12 march\Linux uname Command tutorial\Linux uname Command tutorial\images\image9 final.png

3. –v option:

The–v option prints the Kernel version on the command line:

$ uname –v

D:\Aqsa\12 march\Linux uname Command tutorial\Linux uname Command tutorial\images\image8 final.png

4. –r option:

Use –r option to display the kernel release details.

$ uname –r

D:\Aqsa\12 march\Linux uname Command tutorial\Linux uname Command tutorial\images\image11 final.png

5. –m option:

Use –m option to see the currently running machine hardware name.

$ uname –m

D:\Aqsa\12 march\Linux uname Command tutorial\Linux uname Command tutorial\images\image10 final.png

If the output value is x86 64, it means that you are using the 64-bit operating system. Moreover, the i686 value refers to the 32-bit operating system.

6. –n option:

The –n parameter with the uname command is used to display the network node hostname.

$ uname –n

D:\Aqsa\12 march\Linux uname Command tutorial\Linux uname Command tutorial\images\image2 final.png

7. -p option:

Use –p parameter with uname; it will give current processor information.

$ uname –p

D:\Aqsa\12 march\Linux uname Command tutorial\Linux uname Command tutorial\images\image1 final.png

8. –i option:

The –i option gets the current hardware system information and prints it on the command-line:

$ uname –i

D:\Aqsa\12 march\Linux uname Command tutorial\Linux uname Command tutorial\images\image4 final.png

9. –o option:

The –o option with the uname command is used to print the operating system name.

$ uname –o

D:\Aqsa\12 march\Linux uname Command tutorial\Linux uname Command tutorial\images\image3 final.png

10. –version option:

Use –version parameter with uname to get uname version details as follows:

$ uname --version

D:\Aqsa\12 march\Linux uname Command tutorial\Linux uname Command tutorial\images\image6 final.png

11. Help option:

The –help shows us all possible commands and their usage.

$ uname --help

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Conclusion:

The uname command is a very efficient command through which we can get all possible information about the operating system, hardware, kernel, and processor information. To figure out why a piece of software is not performing as expected, you’ll need to know the kernel version, operating system, and basic hardware details.

About the author

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Aqsa Maqbool

As a Software engineer, I am passionate to write about various IT related
articles but have deep interest in Linux. I spend most of my time reading Linux related blogs and IT related books. I want to serve the world with my writing skills.